Tracing Copper Accumulation Is Better at Detecting Prostate Cancer Recurrence, Study Finds

Tracing Copper Accumulation Is Better at Detecting Prostate Cancer Recurrence, Study Finds
A new imaging agent detecting copper accumulation in tumors is better at detecting early prostate cancer relapse than the tracing molecules used currently, an Italian study shows. Because the new agent is not excreted through the urine – and therefore does not accumulate in the bladder – it allows for a more thorough exploration of the pelvic and prostatic region than standard imaging agents. The molecule also is better at detecting the site of relapse in patients with low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels.

The study, "64CuCl2 PET/CT in Prostate Cancer Relapse," was published in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

Copper is key for the activation of several molecules involved in cell proliferation. Its levels are increased in tumors, suggesting that copper concentration in cancer cells could be used as an imaging biomarker for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans.

Studies in mice and humans with prostate cancer already had shown that agent, copper-64 chloride (64CuCl2), accumulated in cancerous regions. But its ability to detect prostate cancer relapse following surgery or radiation therapy remained unknown. So, researchers conducted a clinical trial comparing 64CuClwith the commonly used PET/CT tracer fluorine-18-choline (18F-choline) in 50 prostate cancer pat
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *