Study Finds Angiogenic Inhibitor For Prostate cancer

Study Finds Angiogenic Inhibitor For Prostate cancer
shutterstock_181667498Scientists from Bristol and Nottingham Universities have found that a single molecule plays a major role in the angiogenesis (formation of new blood vessels) of prostate cancer. The study Serine–arginine protein kinase 1 (SRPK1) inhibition as a potential novel targeted therapeutic strategy in prostate cancer published in the Oncogene journal and led by Dr. Sebastian Oltean from Bristol University and Dr. David Bates, Professor of Oncology in The University of Nottingham’s Cancer Biology Unit, could be the base for future drug development to improve the long-term control and prognosis for prostate cancer patients. “This work opens up a new avenue for drug development for prostate cancer. This is a new target, and we believe we will be able to make drugs that hit this target in those patients that can benefit, with prostate cancer, and potentially other cancers too,” said Professor Bates in a Nottingham University press release. The team found that a molecule called SRPK1 could be targeted to stop prostate cancer progression, since it plays a crucial role in angiogenesi
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.