Discrepancy in BPH Treatment Prices May Not Reflect Efficacy

Discrepancy in BPH Treatment Prices May Not Reflect Efficacy
uclaDespite the fact that there is a 400% discrepancy between the cheapest and most expensive health care methods to treat benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), there are in fact no differences in its effectiveness. Those are the conclusions of new research conducted at the University of California - Los Angeles, which analyzed for the first time the costs related to the healthcare process to treat the disease using time-driven activity-based cost analysis. The findings of the one-year research, which was published at Healthcare: The Journal of Delivery Science and Innovation, revealed that there is no evidence that the more expensive treatments also have better outcomes, as explained in a press release by the first author of the study, Alan Kaplan, who is a resident physician in the Department of Urology at UCLA. "The rising cost of health care is unsustainable, and a big part of the problem is that health systems, health care providers and policy makers have a poor understanding of how much health care really costs," stated Kaplan. "Until this is well understood, taxpayers, insurers and patients alike will continue to bear the burden of soaring health care costs." The UCLA research team used a new method based on the costs of time-driven activity, in order to understand the
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *