Study Shows Link Between Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Prostate Cancer Cell Inhibition

Study Shows Link Between Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Prostate Cancer Cell Inhibition
This week Dr. Kathryn E. Meier, Ph.D., Professor and Associate Dean for Graduate Education, Washington State University College of Pharmacy, and her collaborators released study results in which they found that a drug mimicking the action of omega 3s can work as well or better than fatty acids in suppressing cancer cells.  The study entitled, “Omega-3 fatty acids and other FFA4 agonists inhibit growth factor signaling in human prostate cancer cells,” was published in the Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. Background Terminology: Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs): called “essential” because the body can’t make these needed nutritional components and must digest them. There are two known EFAs: alpha-linolenic acid (an omega-3 fatty acid) and linoleic acid (an omega-6 fatty acid) Omega-3 fatty acid (n-3 FAs): Three fatty acids compose the omega-3 family: Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is found in English walnuts, in some types of beans, and in canola, soybean, flaxseed/linseed, and olive oils. The other 2, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are found in fish, including fish oil and supplements. Cell lines: a population of cells derived from a single cell and containing the same genetic makeup that are used in many scientific experiments. Cell culture serum: is a complex organic solution containing proteins, polypeptides, growth factors, amino acids, nucleosides, lipids, carbohydrates, hormones, vitamins and other components to provide nutrients to experimental cell lines. The scientific community is in agreement on the anti-inflammatory properties of n-3 FAs, and its link to lowering risks of chronic diseases such as heart disease, depression, and autoimmune diseases, including diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis.
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