Study Identifies Protein Kinases as Potential Therapeutic Targets for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Study Identifies Protein Kinases as Potential Therapeutic Targets for Metastatic Prostate Cancer
Researchers from the UCLA Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research have identified specific enzymes called protein kinases that participate in critical steps of bone and prostate cancer metastatic process, suggesting these kinases as potential therapeutic targets. The findings, which were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences under the title “Functional screen identifies kinases driving prostate cancer visceral and bone metastasis,” are relevant for the management and treatment of prostate cancer since failure of early detection commonly results in bone metastases that become more difficult to treat and can eventually lead to death. In the United States, metastatic prostate cancer (PC) kills around 30,000 men each year, making it the second main cause of cancer death in men. Among PC patients, 90% will develop bone metastases, with additional sites of metastases including lymph nodes, liver, adrenal glands, and lungs. The gold-standard of therapies for metastatic disease are androgen blocking therapies that inhibit androgen synthesis or signaling through the androgen receptor. However, metastatic prostate cancer becomes resistant to androgen blocking. Unfortunately, second-line therapies like chemotherapy (docetaxel, cabazitaxel) and radiotherapy only prolong survival for 2 to 4 months. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify new therapeutic targets for metastatic prostate cancer although it has been a very difficult task. “Onc
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