Promising Prostate Cancer-Sniffing Device Passes Important Test Milestone

Promising Prostate Cancer-Sniffing Device Passes Important Test Milestone
A team of British  researchers from the University of Liverpool and the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) have passed an important milestone in their quest to develop a urine test for diagnosing prostate cancer. Such a test could mean that invasive prostatic diagnostic procedures that men are currently obliged to undergo will eventually be replaced by faster, simpler, non-invasive techniques that don't require urinalysis. The scientists working on the project describe their objective of creating a diagnostic test procedure that can "smell" cancer in a man's urine in a paper published in the Journal of Breath Research titled "The use of a gas chromatography (GC)-sensor system combined with advanced statistical methods towards the diagnosis of urological malignancies." The paper is co-authored by Raphael B.M. Aggio, Ben de Lacy Costello, Paul White, Tanzeela Khalid, Norman M. Ratcliffe, Raj Persad, and Chris S.J. Probert of various departments and institutes at the University of Liverpool, the University of the West of England at Bristol, Imperial College London, and the Bristol Urological Institute. Observing that prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers, and that serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is currently the gold standard used to select men to be referred for biopsies, they note that PSA use remains controversial as a diagnostic. As an alternative, the investigators propose a GC-sensor algorithm system that would classify urine samples from patients with urological symptoms. Working in collab
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