New Advanced Prostate Cancer Treatment Approach, Combining Radiotherapies, Being Tested in Belfast

New Advanced Prostate Cancer Treatment Approach, Combining Radiotherapies, Being Tested in Belfast
Queen’s University Belfast researchers, in partnership with the Belfast Trust, are leading a clinical trial evaluating a new combination of two radiotherapy treatments in men with advanced prostate cancer (PC), where the cancer has spread to the bones. The ADRRAD trial, for Androgen Deprivation Therapy, Pelvic Radiotherapy and Radium-223 for presentation T1-4 N/1 M1B adenocarcinoma of prostate, has already started at the Northern Ireland Cancer Center, Belfast, and is funded by Friends of the Cancer Centre and Bayer Pharmaceuticals. The trial will treat PC patients with bone involvement (an estimated 10 percent of such cancers) over 18 months with two current forms of radiotherapy, Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) to target PC cells in the pelvis, and Radium 223 to target the disease in the bones. VMAT is an externally delivered type of radiation therapy that manipulates beams to adapt to the shape of the tumor, delivering a more precise dose of radiation and limiting damage to surrounding tissue. Radium 223 is a recent ‘bone-seeking’ drug, a type of internal radiotherapy that is administered intravenously. Once inside the bones, the drug releases radiation that travels minimally – about 2 to 10 cells deep, or less than a millimeter – to deliver a high dose of cancer cell-killing radiation close to tumor deposits on bone. Advanced PC patients are commonly treated with hormone therapy that intends to diminish a tumor by limiting how much test
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