Clinical Trial Evaluating New Way of Using Radiotherapy to Target Prostate Cancer Treatment

Clinical Trial Evaluating New Way of Using Radiotherapy to Target Prostate Cancer Treatment
Physicians at University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center are conducting a clinical trial that uses a novel form of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to deliver radiation to the exact area affected by prostate cancer, instead of irradiating the entire gland. This trial aims to determine if using radiation only on a targeted region in an early stage prostate cancer will increase treatment options and reduce side effects. If successful, the trial (NCT02163317), which uses a patented, magnetic resonance (MRI)-guided approach to SBRT, could impact the standard of care for patients with low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), also called stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), is a type of radiation therapy in which small, well-defined tumors are treated with high doses of radiation by focused millimeter precision. The goal of this type of focused radiation therapy is to administer a high enough dose to kill the cancer cells while lessening damage to the surrounding organs and tissues. The first patient had the procedure preformed by Dr. Lee Ponsky, a urologist at the UH Urology Institute, and by Dr. Rodney Ellis, a radiation oncologist and the trial's co-investigator. To date, no side effects have been reported. “Our hypothesis is that this method may offer a viable treatment option for men with early stage prostate cancer before their cancer advances, while also minimizing or even eliminating life-changing side effects of treatment,”
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