Scientists Identify Biomarker for Advanced Prostate Cancer as Specific Androgen Receptor in Circulating Cancer Cells

Scientists Identify Biomarker for Advanced Prostate Cancer as Specific Androgen Receptor in Circulating Cancer Cells
Expression of the nuclear androgen-receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) found in the blood of patients with advanced prostate cancer predicts the patients will fail to respond to the commonly prescribed androgen receptor signaling (ARS) inhibitors, but will have superior survival if treated with a taxane therapy. These findings were recently published in JAMA Oncology in the study "Association of AR-V7 on Circulating Tumor Cells as a Treatment-Specific Biomarker With Outcomes and Survival in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer." Almost all patients with metastatic prostate cancer progress to metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), where the standard of care includes the ARS inhibitors abiraterone and enzalutamide, and taxanes. These therapies are known to be effective in extending patients' lifes, but 20 to 25 percent of patients fail to respond in first-line approaches. This number increases to 60 to 70 percent in those receiving second-line therapy. When the determination of nonresponse is delayed in these patients, the chance to benefit from alternative treatments may be compromised. Prostate cancer is an androgen-dependent disease. However, there are splice variants of the androgen receptor that can be activated independent of ligand binding, making cells resistant to androgen deprivation therapies. In fact, AR-V7 has been recently linked to resistance to the ARS inhibitors abiraterone and enzalutamide when expressed in the C
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *