Non-metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients Who Eat Plenty of Nuts Appear to Have Decreased Risk of Death, Study Says

Non-metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients Who Eat Plenty of Nuts Appear to Have Decreased Risk of Death, Study Says
Researchers at Chan School of Public Health and the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston have revealed that eating lots of tree nuts -- including almonds, hazelnuts, pecans, pine nuts, Brazil nuts, cashews, walnuts, and pistachios -- may reduce the rates of death in non-metastatic prostate cancer (PC) patients. The study,"Nut consumption and prostate cancer risk and mortality," was funded by the International Tree Nut Council and published in the British Journal of Cancer. Nuts are rich in nutrients and bioactive compounds that may have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cardio-protective properties. Recent epidemiological studies have pointed to an association between nut consumption and reduced risk of several chronic conditions, including type 2 diabetes, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. Although little is known about nut consumption and prostate cancer incidence, recent studies have suggested that insulin resistance, a condition that leads to type 2 diabetes, may lead to prostate cancer risk and progression. Therefore, investigators addressed whether nut consumption could affect prostate cancer incidence or PC-derived mortality. They examined data from a large prospective cohort study, the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS), established in 1986, that included 47,299 male U.S. health professionals. Participants completed a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire at baseline and every four years after, where, among other foods, nut consumption was evaluated. During 26 years of follow-up, 6,810 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer
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