Rosetta Genomics’ FISH Testing Services to Be Used in Prostate Cancer Study

Rosetta Genomics’ FISH Testing Services to Be Used in Prostate Cancer Study
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Rosetta Genomics announced the signing of a service agreement with an unnamed global pharmaceutical, under which it will provide Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) testing services for use by that company in a clinical trial it is conducting in prostate cancer (PC).

The study will use FISH to find the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene status in a series of prostate adenocarcinoma cases. Its primary goal is to determine if PTEN status using FISH detects cancers that immunohistochemistry (IHC) did not. The concordance of the FISH results will be evaluated for cases where PTEN status was previously established by IHC.

Rosetta specializes in microRNA-based and other molecular diagnostic tools. Its FISH technology is used for the early detection of genomic changes, which might detect cancer, to identify if patients are likely to respond to specific, targeted therapies, and to measure the potential aggressiveness of the disease. The FISH service was found to be best-in-class with a highly competitive success rate of 98% in reaching informative results and a turnaround time of three to four days.

FISH technology is intended for the early detection of genomic changes, which might include cancer, to identify if patients are likely to respond to specific, targeted therapies and to measure the potential aggressiveness of the disease. According to a press release, FISH has a highly competitive success rate of 98% in reaching informative results, and a turnaround time of three to four days.

“We are very pleased to have our FISH testing selected by this global pharmaceutical for their clinical testing study. The quality, reliability and turn-around time of our best-in-class FISH testing enabled us to win this important business,” Kenneth A. Berlin, Rosetta Geonomics’ president and chief executive officer, said in the release.

Rosetta’s portfolio of cancer testing services is now commercially available through the company’s CLIA-certified labs.

Read More Recent News

A recent study led by scientists at Toronto’s Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, have identified 45 genes linked to the development and progression of prostate cancer.

The study, “Modulation of long noncoding RNAs by risk SNPs underlying genetic predispositions to prostate cancer,” was published in the journal Nature Genetics.

Inês holds a PhD in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Lisbon, Portugal, where she specialized in blood vessel biology, blood stem cells, and cancer. Before that, she studied Cell and Molecular Biology at Universidade Nova de Lisboa and worked as a research fellow at Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologias and Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência. Inês currently works as a Managing Science Editor, striving to deliver the latest scientific advances to patient communities in a clear and accurate manner.
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Inês holds a PhD in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Lisbon, Portugal, where she specialized in blood vessel biology, blood stem cells, and cancer. Before that, she studied Cell and Molecular Biology at Universidade Nova de Lisboa and worked as a research fellow at Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologias and Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência. Inês currently works as a Managing Science Editor, striving to deliver the latest scientific advances to patient communities in a clear and accurate manner.
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