9/11 Firefighters May Just Be Starting to Develop Prostate Cancer, Study Says

9/11 Firefighters May Just Be Starting to Develop Prostate Cancer, Study Says
Higher rates of certain cancers have been documented among firefighters who responded to the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC). A recent study by researchers at Montefiore Medical Center in New York, however, found no significantly increased  incidence of prostate cancer among firefighters exposed to the toxins released by the collapse of the Twin Towers compared to firefighters working in other U.S. cities. But the study, which spanned September 2001 through December 2009, did see a rising rate of prostate cancers among the responding firefighters— between 2005-09, it was 1.4 times higher than in firefighters from other urban areas — suggesting that as the normal latency period for certain cancers draws to close, these observations may change. The study, "Post-9/11 cancer incidence in World Trade Center-exposed New York City firefighters as compared to a pooled cohort of firefighters from San Francisco, Chicago and Philadelphia (9/11/2001-2009)," was published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine. During rescue and recovery efforts at the WTC, more than 13,000 firefighters with the City of New York (FDNY), and thousands of other responders, were exposed to potentially harmful substances. These included asbestos and polychlorinated biphenyls, both of which are classified as carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. "Specifically, bladder, gastrointestinal, liver, lung, prostate, melanoma, mesothelioma, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma have been found to be related to
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