Radiation Therapy or Radical Surgery Seen to Benefit Prostate Cancer Patients with Newly Found Metastasis

Radiation Therapy or Radical Surgery Seen to Benefit Prostate Cancer Patients with Newly Found Metastasis
Patients newly diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer may benefit from localized treatment, a new study suggests, showing that either removal of the prostate gland (radical prostatectomy) or a form of radiation therapy called intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can markedly improve their survival chances. The results, included in the abstract "Local Therapy Improves Overall Survival in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Prostate Cancer," were recently presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2016 Annual Meeting. "While numerous treatment options exist for those with early stage prostate cancer, therapies are more limited for those with advanced disease that has spread beyond the prostate," Rahul R. Parikh, MD, a Rutgers Cancer Institute radiation oncologist, and co-director of proton beam therapy at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and its flagship hospital, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital (RWJ), and study's senior author, said in a press release. Researchers sought to examine whether therapies that are often used in localized disease, such as radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy, could also be used to improve the the outcomes of patients with newly determined metastatic prostate cancer. Using the National Cancer Database, which includes data from more than 1,500 accredited facilities, they identified 6,051 e
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