Bipolar Androgen Therapy Yields Promising Results in Prostate Cancer

Bipolar Androgen Therapy Yields Promising Results in Prostate Cancer
Bipolar androgen therapy, where the body is alternately flooded with and starved of testosterone, is safe and effective for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, according to a study presented at the 28th Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics in Munich, Germany. The researchers, led by Samuel Denmeade, MD, professor of oncology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, presented results from 47 men with metastatic prostate cancer resistant to chemical or surgical treatment who have completed at least three cycles of bipolar androgen therapy. For the study, RESTORE (NCT02090114), the researchers injected a high dose of testosterone (400 mg) into the muscle of the men every 28 days. The men continued to receive luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist therapy to inhibit their natural testosterone production, but stopped treatment with the anti-cancer drugs Zytiga (abiraterone) and Xtandi (enzalutamide) that inhibit androgen receptor signaling, against which they had developed resistance. "Our goal is to shock the cancer cells by exposing them rapidly to very high, followed by very low, levels of testosterone in the blood," Denmeade said in a press release. The first arm of the study looked at 30 men who were treated with testosterone after their disease became resistant to Xtandi and started to progress. The results showed the levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) decl
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