Annual Prostate Cancer Screening Has Little Impact on Mortality Rates, Study Finds

Annual Prostate Cancer Screening Has Little Impact on Mortality Rates, Study Finds
Annual screening for prostate cancer (PC) shows few differences in mortality rates, but does indicate the need to focus on men who will likely die of the disease, according to results from a 15-year follow-up study. From 1993 to 2001, 10 academic medical centers in the U.S. screened 76,685 men and 78,216 women enrolled in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) cancer screening trial program. The goal was to find out if annual screening was effective at identifying cancers early and, as a result, reduce the mortality rate from the diseases. The men and women in the study were followed-up after 15 years. These results relate to the men who underwent prostate cancer screening (NCT00002540). Published in the journal Cancer, the results from this investigation don’t deny the importance of getting screened for prostate cancer, say the researchers, but imply there are clues in the data that could help patients and healthcare providers make better personalized decisions. The publication is titled “Extended mortality results for prostate cancer screening in the PLCO trial with median follow-up of 15 years.” "What we can see from these results is that most men diagnosed with prostate cancer will not die from their disease," E. David Crawford, MD, co-author of the study and a researcher at the University of Colorado Cancer Center, said in a
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