Six Things You Shouldn’t Say to Men With Prostate Cancer

Six Things You Shouldn’t Say to Men With Prostate Cancer
As I began sharing the news I had prostate cancer with friends and family, some of the responses I received were hurtful rather than helpful. I don’t think anyone purposely set out to hurt me. I think too many people said he first thing that came to mind. Here are six comments that hurt rather

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Rick Redner received his master’s degree in social work from Michigan State University. He has spent many years working as a medical and psychiatric social worker He is the author of the award winning book I Left My Prostate in San Francisco-Where's Yours? His second book Everything You Never Wanted to Know About Erectile Dysfunction and Penile Implants won the Beverly Hills International Book Awards in Men's Health in 2016. Additionally, the book was a winner in the 2017 IAN Book of the Year Awards.


  1. Chris O'Neill says:

    Maybe 7 could be, if you’ve had prostate surgery and had no problems whatsoever, don’t tell other men who have had surgery that you don’t know what their big deal is.

    It’s incredible how self-centered some people are.

    • Rick Redner says:

      It is frustrating and hurtful to share the news and receive a very poor response back. Early in my journey I gave up on the idea that a healthy person could provide meaningful comfort after hearing the news. It’s too shocking to them. The best comfort will come from those further down the road on the journey. If you need comfort or support the best place to find it is either on-line in PC forums or in person support groups.

  2. Brad Dishno says:

    What people don’t realize is that the cancer goes into remission and doesn’t really go away. Even after 45 radiation treatments the cancer has just stopped getting worse rather than being completly gone. I personnally found that most people would rather just avoid talking about it.

    • Chris O'Neill says:

      “doesn’t really go away”

      Indeed. A lot of people, including Ben Stiller for example, think that getting a PSA of zero after surgery means that they are “cured” and that the surgery “saved their life”. The issue is just too complex for a lot of people to deal with.

      • Rod R says:

        I know a good number of men who are 25 years out from prostate surgery and have not had additional problems. If that is not “cured”, it is as good as a cure.

        • Tim Bossie says:

          We get what you’re saying Rod. If the cancer has not returned, or caused problems in 25 years that is a great thing. However, there is always the chance that it can manifest again or metastasize in another area.

  3. Andy says:

    I didn’t find ‘I am really going to miss you’ very helpful either.
    As an atheist I find ‘ I will pray for you’ or ‘It’s all art of god’s plan ‘ far from useful either

  4. Rolf Vasil says:

    “That’s too bad, my father, (Uncle Cousin, etc) died from prostate cancer.” That one is really really bad!! Its really important to be careful when it comes about the prostate, specially at certain age, my uncle was not careful and when he tried to change it was late, he died of cancer, prostate cancer to be more specific, guys this is a serious thing I know many of us are shy to go to the doctor and get a check but it is neccesary, I try my best to be careful , i eat clean (healthy), i try to wrkout, sometimes i go for a run , i drink much water and i avoid drinkng too much (maybe this is the hardest part lol), also i take a supplement called alpha rise, it has helped me with my urinary problem, i used to feel pain whenever i had to pee but thats just past. Dont forget to take precautions guys!

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