Metastatic Prostate Cancer Is Rising After Routine PSA Testing Drops, Study Finds

Metastatic Prostate Cancer Is Rising After Routine PSA Testing Drops, Study Finds
Diagnoses of metastatic prostate cancer in older men are on the rise after a record low in 2011, a new research study has found. Led by Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian researchers, the study was published in JAMA Oncology in an article titled “Increase in Prostate Cancer Distant Metastases at Diagnosis in the United States.” The findings suggest the increased incidence is likely related to the 2012 change in prostate cancer screening guidelines issued by the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF). The new USPSTF guidelines stopped recommending routine prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, citing evidence the screening was not saving lives and often led to extra tests and treatments that actually had negative effects, including pain, incontinence, and impotence. PSA tests measure how much prostate-specific antigen is in a patient’s blood. Elevated levels might indicate the presence of prostate cancer. PSA testing was included in general recommendations for prostate cancer diagnosis in the early 1990s for all men age 50 and older, and for men over age 40 with a history of prostate cancer in their family. Since PSA screening was introduced, the incidence of metastatic prostate cancer diagnoses dropped about 70 percent and overall deaths from prostate cancer decreased by 5
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.