Prostate Cancer Mortality Risk May Depend on Where You Live

Prostate Cancer Mortality Risk May Depend on Where You Live
More than 1 million men died of prostate cancer in the United States between 1980 and 2014, but the risk of death from prostate and other cancers may depend on where you live. According to a new analysis that examined the trends and differences in cancer mortality rates among U.S. counties, cancer deaths are surging in some counties, even though overall cancer death rates dropped about 20% during that 34-year period. The study, “Trends and Patterns of Disparities in Cancer Mortality Among US Counties, 1980-2014,” was published in JAMA. Cancer mortality rates have declined in the U.S. in recent decades; however, major differences in cancer mortality still exist. Ali Mokdad, PhD, and colleagues estimated age-standardized mortality rates in U.S. counties for 29 cancers, using data from death records retrieved from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) and population counts from the U.S. Census Bureau, the NCHS, and the Human Mortality Database from 1980 to 2014. The researchers found that more than 19.5 million Americans died of cancer between 1980 and 2014. Of these, more than 1 million men died due to prostate cancer. Lung cancer killed more people in the U.S. than prostate or any other cancer. Although many counties (1,558) had significant declines in prostate cancer death rates, percentage changes in male mortality rates between 1980 and 2014 ranged from a 69.4% decrease in Aleutians East Borough, and Aleutians West Census Area, Alaska, to a 26.1% increase in the mortality rate in Owsley County, Ky. Researchers found the highest d
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.