Compound in Broccoli May Halt Cancer Progression by Modulating Damaging Class of RNAs, Study Suggests

Compound in Broccoli May Halt Cancer Progression by Modulating Damaging Class of RNAs, Study Suggests
Eating broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables can lower a man's risk of developing prostate cancer, thanks to a phenotype linked to the highly enriched levels of sulforaphane in these vegetables. Now, scientists at Oregon State University (OSU) suggest that sulforaphane exerts its effects by targeting damaging levels of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Their study, “Long noncoding RNAs and sulforaphane: a target for chemoprevention and suppression of prostate cancer,” appeared in The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. The team analyzed the whole RNA content of normal human prostate epithelial cells and prostate cancer cells, both when treated with sulforaphane or with an innocuous substance, in this case dimethylsulfoxide. It found that sulforaphane changed the expression of about 100 lncRNAS and normalized the levels of some lncRNAs whose expression was altered in cancer cells. "It's obviously of interest that this dietary compound, found at some of its highest levels in broccoli, can affect lncRNAs," Emily Ho, the study's principal investigator, said in a press release. "This could open the door to a whole range of new dietary strategies, foods or drugs that might play a role in cancer suppression or therapeutic control." Ho directs OSU's Moore Family Cent
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One comment

  1. Ian G McRobbie says:

    I have found your article on prostate cancer intresting there is items I did not know about the information that could help me.I was diagnosed with prostate cancer 3 years ago and so far I’m ok.

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