RARP Prostate Cancer Surgery Causes Fewer Urinary, Sexual Problems Than Brachytherapy, Italian Study Finds

RARP Prostate Cancer Surgery Causes Fewer Urinary, Sexual Problems Than Brachytherapy, Italian Study Finds
Men with low-risk prostate cancer have similar recurrence-free survival rates when treated with surgical robotic prostatectomy or brachytherapy, but those who received surgery had fewer urinary or sexual problems two years after treatment, a randomized trial in Italy has concluded. The study, “Robotic prostatectomy versus brachytherapy for the treatment of low-risk prostate cancer,” appeared in the Canadian Journal of Urology. Treatment of early-stage or low-risk prostate cancer relies on active surveillance, surgery or radiation therapy. In particular, both robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and brachytherapy (BP) — a type of internal radiation therapy in which radioactive seeds are placed inside or near a tumor — have been shown to effectively treat prostate cancer. However, until now little was known about their long-term effects. “Treatment decisions that men with low-risk prostate cancer have to make can be difficult, as a lot of it depends on what the patient is looking for and what type of experience their physician has to offer,” Dr. David Samadi, chairman of urology and chief of robotic surgery at New York's Lenox Hill Hospital, said in a press release. Italian researchers at Milan's San Paolo Hospital conducted the single-center, prospective study from January 2012 to January 2016 to compare the outcomes of 165 patients randomly assigned to receive either RARP or BT. They followed all patients for up to two years
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