SBRT Shows Favorable Long-Term Outcomes and Low Severe Toxicity in Studies

SBRT Shows Favorable Long-Term Outcomes and Low Severe Toxicity in Studies
Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has shown good long-term outcomes and low rates of severe toxicity, making it a valid treatment option for men with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer, according to three studies recently presented at the 36th European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO) Annual Meeting. All three studies explored the long-term safety and efficacy of the advanced technique, designed to deliver high doses of radiation therapy to the tumor in a few fractioned radiation treatments (usually up to five), and with a high specificity to the tumor site. Researchers at the Swedish Cancer Institute in Seattle recruited 309 patients across 21 cancer centers to gather data on long-term treatment outcomes. Earlier reports have only been composed of single-center studies, and the research team wanted data from a broader pool. All patients were treated with SBRT, and researchers compared results to those obtained in earlier studies of people treated with external beam radiotherapy. Researchers followed study participants — 172 with low-risk, and 137 with intermediate-risk cancer — for a median of 61 months. Only five patients experienced grade 3 toxic effects, which all affected the genitals or urinary system. More severe side effects were not seen during the study. Analyses showed that five-year survival was 95.6 percent, with disease-free survival of 97.1 percent. Looking separately at low- and intermediate-risk patients, researchers noted that the 97.3 percent disease-free survival seen in the low-risk group was better than the 93 percent reported for patients treated with external beam r
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