Prostate Cancer Testing Guidelines Fail to Cover Key Genetic Features, Study Contends

Prostate Cancer Testing Guidelines Fail to Cover Key Genetic Features, Study Contends
Prostate cancer testing guidelines fail to cover important genetic features of patients with the disease, a shortcoming that could be having a major impact on diagnosis and treatment decisions, according to a study. The researchers from the Tulane University School of Medicine and Invitae Corporation who collaborated on the study called for the guidelines to be re-evaluated. The team presented the results, titled “Need for re-evaluation of current guidelines based on results from germline genetic testing in prostate cancer,” at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago, June 2-6. Conference judges designated it a Best of ASCO presentation. "Some of the genes implicated in prostate cancer are also associated with other conditions, making it vital for patients and their families to have genetic information," Dr. Robert Nussbaum, Invitae's chief medical officer, said in a press release. "For example, a BRCA variant may be passed on to a daughter, putting her at risk for breast cancer, or a Lynch syndrome variant may indicate a risk for colon cancer, uterine or ovarian cancer, as well as other cancers. "Now that genetic testing is accessible and affordable, we must reevaluate how we are using this powerful information to help improve healthcare for patients and their families," Nussbaum added. The research team formed by researchers from the
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