Galeterone Study Sheds Light on Promising Next-Gen Therapies for Advanced Prostate Cancer

Galeterone Study Sheds Light on Promising Next-Gen Therapies for Advanced Prostate Cancer
A new study shows how galeterone is metabolized in the body, suggesting that it shares similarities with other steroidal anti-androgen drugs used to treat advanced prostate cancer. The finding could lay the foundation for development of next-generation drugs that offer better treatment options for the disease. The study titled, “Steroidogenic Metabolism of Galeterone Reveals a Diversity of Biochemical Activities,” was published in the journal Cell Chemical Biology. Prostate cancer growth is fueled by male androgens, such as testosterone. Generally, prostate cancer is sensitive to androgen deprivation therapy, also known as medical castration. However, the tumor often becomes resistant to this type of treatment as it starts to synthesize its own stores of testosterone and/or dihydrotestosterone. That has led researchers to develop a new class of anti-androgen drugs that stop the supply of these hormones to the prostate tumor. "Despite an array of improved treatment options that have become available over the past decade, prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer mortality in men in the United States. There are few therapeutic options for men whose cancer has become resistant to all therapies," Nima Sharifi, MD, Cleveland Clinic, lead author on the study, said in a press release. "Our goal is to improve the use and role of these existing drugs and hopefully design new therapies that work better and longer." Galeterone, a Phase 3 clinical trial candidate for castration-resistant pros
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