New Oxygen-enhanced Imaging Technique Identifies Aggressive Prostate Cancer in Mice

New Oxygen-enhanced Imaging Technique Identifies Aggressive Prostate Cancer in Mice
A new imaging technique called oxygen enhanced optoacoustic tomography (OE-OT) may improve the ability to distinguish between aggressive and less-aggressive prostate cancer cases, identifying those patients who can undergo chemo and/or radiation therapy, according to researchers. The study, titled “Oxygen Enhanced Optoacoustic Tomography (OE-OT) Reveals Vascular Dynamics in Murine Models of Prostate Cancer,” was published in the journal Theranostics. Tumor cells grow much faster than normal cells and eventually need their own supply of blood. But the resulting blood vessels tend to have different properties between patients. A tumor may have good or poor quality blood vessels, both of which lead to very different tumor environments. Poor quality blood vessels contribute to a condition called hypoxia, which refers to low oxygen levels, and can lead to increased resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Therefore, the ability to noninvasively image the oxygen supply of tumors in prostate cancer can help improve diagnosis and aid with the staging of the disease by being able to identify the more aggressive, hypoxic tumors and the less aggressive, oxygen-reliant tumors. Currently, there are some approaches that can measure oxygen supply that have been investigated in cancer, such as special versions of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). But while these methods hold promise, they have limitations. Therefore, there is a need for better imaging of oxygen supply. The new approach, called optoacoustic tomography (OT), currently in cl
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