New Low-cost Prostate Cancer Tracer Shows Promise for Early Diagnosis in More Patients

New Low-cost Prostate Cancer Tracer Shows Promise for Early Diagnosis in More Patients
A PhD student at King's College London in England developed a new prostate cancer tracer — called 68Ga-THP-PSMA — that is low-cost, quick, and easy to produce. The tracer, which targets the PSMA protein, can be easily produced in smaller clinics and hospitals and is expected to extend diagnostic scans to more patients. The radioactive compound was developed by Jennifer Young with support from King's College London and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust. It is designed for use in positron emission emission tomography (PET) scans. The study describing the manufacturing process and preclinical testing is titled, "68Ga-THP-PSMA: A PET Imaging Agent for Prostate Cancer Offering Rapid, Room-Temperature, 1-Step Kit-Based Radiolabeling," and appeared in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. PET scans are a specialized radiology procedure that uses small amounts of a radiotracer to examine various body tissues. Specifically, PET studies evaluate the metabolism of a particular organ or tissue, helping doctors evaluate the organ’s function (physiology), structure (anatomy), and its biochemical properties. In cancer, PET tracers are usually designed to target a molecule that is highly produced by the cancer cells. This means that the r
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