New Compounds May Counteract Chemotherapy Resistance in Prostate Cancer Cells

New Compounds May Counteract Chemotherapy Resistance in Prostate Cancer Cells
Researchers at Southern Methodist University discovered three new small molecules that overcome the resistance to chemotherapy observed in patients with prostate, breast, and ovarian cancer. The study, "Targeted inhibitors of P-glycoprotein increase chemotherapeutic-induced mortality of multidrug resistant tumor cells" was published in the open access journal Scientific Reports. One of the strategies cancer cells use to resist therapies is to increase the number of pumps (transporters) that sit at the membrane and pump out the toxic compounds that compose anti-cancer therapies. While these pumps occur naturally in our cells, cancer cells can increase their numbers for their own benefit. As a consequence, chemotherapy efficacy is largely reduced and the tumor is allowed to grow and spread. "The cancer cell itself can use all these built-in defenses to protect it from the kinds of things we're using to try to kill it with," study co-lead author John G. Wise at The Center for Drug Discovery, Design and Delivery, the Center for Scientific Computing, Southern Methodist University, in Dallas, Texas, said in a press release. In cancer cells, including those in prostate tumors, the most common pump is P-glycoprotein or P-gp, but scientists
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