Provenge Better for African-Americans Than Men of Other Ethnicities, Analysis Shows

Provenge Better for African-Americans Than Men of Other Ethnicities, Analysis Shows
Provenge (sipuleucel-T), a treatment approved in the U.S. for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, significantly increased the number of patients alive at three years, compared to a placebo, a retrospective analysis of Phase 3 clinical data shows. The treatment, which harnesses the immune system to fight cancer, was particularly effective in African-American men, researchers report. Those findings were presented in February at the 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary (ASCO GU) Cancers Symposium, in San Francisco, in a poster titled "Interpreting survival outcomes for African-American (AA) patients (pts) with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with sipuleucel-T (SIP-T) with number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB)." Provenge, marketed by Dendreon Pharmaceuticals, is an immunotherapy that uses a patient’s own immune cells to fight prostate cancer. It consists of a fraction of white blood cells that have been exposed to a prostate cancer protein, being primed to activate the remaining immune cells to fight cancer. In 2010, Provenge became the first immunotherapy approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for metastatic prostate cancer, after extending the lives of patients by four months, compared to a placebo. After this approval, a Phase 4 trial called PROCEED (NCT01306890) was designed to continue studying Provenge in a real-world setting, particularly the incidence of cerebrovascular events and patient survival in the long term. Results from this registry,  it showed that the overall survival of African-American men treated with Provenge was 9.3 months longer than for Caucasian patients who received the treatment. To confirm those findings, researchers conducted a retrospective
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