Some PC Patients Can Safely Receive Short but Intense Course of Radiation

Some PC Patients Can Safely Receive Short but Intense Course of Radiation
Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), which delivers higher doses of radiation over a significantly shorter period of time, can be safely given to men with low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer with similar long-term efficacy as conventional radiation therapy, a study shows. The approach, which reduces the duration of treatment from 45 days to just four or five days, led to similar recurrence rates as other forms of radiation, "strongly suggesting that SBRT be considered a standard option for treating low-risk and intermediate-risk" patients, researchers said. The study, "Long-term Outcomes of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Low-Risk and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer," was recently published in JAMA Network Open. “Most men with low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer undergo conventional radiation, which requires them to come in daily for treatment and takes an average of nine weeks to complete,” lead author Amar Kishan, assistant professor of radiation oncology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and researcher at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, said in a press release. “That can be very burdensome on a patient and be a huge interruption in their life. With the improvements being made to modern technology, we’ve found that using stereotactic body radiotherapy
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