Evidence Supports Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy as a Standard of Care for Localized PC

Evidence Supports Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy as a Standard of Care for Localized PC
Cumulative evidence to date supports the implementation of stereotactic body radiotherapy — a highly precise radiation therapy delivered in shorter periods of time — as a standard treatment for people with localized prostate cancer, a study shows. The study, “Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Over 6,000 Patients Treated On Prospective Studies,” was published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men in the U.S.and is a big component of the yearly healthcare expenditure. External beam radiotherapy, a method that involves delivering radiation beams to a patient's tumor, is an effective treatment for men with localized prostate cancer. Traditionally, this type of radiotherapy was delivered in small daily doses over eight to nine weeks to spare the healthy tissues adjacent to the tumor. However, a serious drawback to this approach is the number of times the person has to undergo radiotherapy. That not only increases healthcare costs, but also creates a greater burden and challenge for patients. Over the last 20 years, with technological advances, treatments have significantly improved. In particular, the emergence of a type of radiotherapy known as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), allows treatment in just four to seven sessions. SBRT works by giving radiotherapy from many different angles around the body. The beams meet at the t
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