Trial Shows Erleada Can Prolong Metastatic Castration-sensitive PC Patients’ Lives

Trial Shows Erleada Can Prolong Metastatic Castration-sensitive PC Patients’ Lives
Adding Erleada (apalutamide), Janssen's next-generation androgen receptor inhibitor, to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) can prolong life and extend the time without disease worsening in men with metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer, a Phase 3 trial shows. The findings — which supported Janssen's application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration requesting Erleada's approval for this patient population — were recently revealed during the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago. The presentation was titled “First results from TITAN: A phase III double-blind, randomized study of apalutamide (APA) versus placebo (PBO) in patients (pts) with metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer (mCSPC) receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT),” and findings were simultaneously published in The New England Journal of Medicine. ADT is one of the mainstays of prostate cancer treatment. It works by reducing the amount of androgens — the so-called "male hormones," including testosterone — in the body. Because androgens drive the growth of some prostate cancers (the "castration-sensitive" ones, defined by their responsiveness to ADT), this lowering of hormone levels can slow cancer growth. Erleada works by binding to the androgen receptor, blocking it from being activated by androgens in the body. In theory, this would achieve a similar end, albeit through a slightly different mechanism — yet might combining ADT and Erleada have benefits beyond either alone? To find out, researchers conducted the TITAN Phase 3 clinical trial (NCT02489318), which was funded by Aragon Pharmaceuticals (now owned by Johnson & Johnson), and Janssen Research and Development (also owned by Johnson & Johnson). In the
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