Study Shows How Prostate Cancer Cells Mimic Bone When They Metastasize

Study Shows How Prostate Cancer Cells Mimic Bone When They Metastasize
Prostate cancer cells can activate genes associated with bone formation and mimic bone cells' behavior, allowing them to spread into bones. Those findings by by Duke University researchers, have revealed that targeting this transformation process may represent an alternative strategy to prevent the progression and metastization of prostate cancer . The study, “Pharmacodynamic study of radium-223 in men with bone metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer,” was published recently in the journal PLOS ONE. At advanced stages of prostate cancer, malignant cells spread into other body parts, often the bones. Bone metastases are often associated with a poor  prognosis and reduced chances of survival. Radiotherapy with radium-233 (a radioactive component) selectively targets bone metastases and improves overall survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), a difficult-to-treat form of the disease that no longer responds to hormone therapy. Still, the mode of action of radium-233 in the bone remains unknown. Understanding the mechanism behind the benefits obtained with radium-233 would allow researchers to design even more effective therapies to potentially prevent spreading of prostate cancer cells into the bone. With this in mind, Duke Cancer Institute researchers conducted an early Phase 1 clinical trial (NCT02204943) that enrolle
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