ADT Linked to Higher Alzheimer’s and Dementia Risk in Older Prostate Cancer Patients, Study Suggests

ADT Linked to Higher Alzheimer’s and Dementia Risk in Older Prostate Cancer Patients, Study Suggests
Men with prostate cancer who undergo treatment with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) — a form of hormone therapy that aims to slow disease progression by reducing the levels of male hormones — may be more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease and dementia, a large database study reports. The study, "Association Between Androgen Deprivation Therapy Use and Diagnosis of Dementia in Men With Prostate Cancer," was published in JAMA Network Open. Androgen deprivation therapy has become a mainstay treatment for many prostate cancer patients, reducing the chances of cancer progression. But these approaches can have long-term adverse effects, including lower sexual function, reduced bone and cardiovascular health, as well as decreases in quality of life and functional status. Cognitive decline is one of the major concerns associated with long-term exposure to ADT. There are many explanations for why they may be linked, including the fact that lower levels of male hormones can increase the chances of other conditions that are known risk factors for Alzheimer's, such as diabetes, heart disease, depression, and loss of lean mass. Nevertheless, the possible association between long-term exposure to ADT and the risk of Alzheimer's and dementia is still uncertain. Investigators at the University of Pennsylvania set out to explore the link between ADT exposure and Alzheimer's and dementia risk among older men with prostate cancer. The retrospective study involved a total of 154,089 men, 66 years or older, who had been diagnosed with localized or advanced prostate cancer between 1996 and 2003, and whose medical records had been stored at the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database. Among these people,
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