Eating Mushrooms May Prevent Prostate Cancer, Japanese Study Suggests

Eating Mushrooms May Prevent Prostate Cancer, Japanese Study Suggests
Eating mushrooms frequently — three times a week or more — may have a reduced risk of prostate cancer compared to those eating mushrooms less than once a week, a study of Japanese men found. The association holds true only for men 50 or older, according to the study's findings, but persists regardless of clinical stage of cancer and consumption of other foods, such as fruit, vegetables, meat and dairy products. The study, “Mushroom consumption and incident risk of prostate cancer in Japan: A pooled analysis of the Miyagi Cohort Study and the Ohsaki Cohort Study,” was published in the International Journal of Cancer. Although there is no absolute way to prevent prostate cancer, studies have suggested that maintaining healthy eating habits, such as consuming more vegetables and fruits, might lower the risk of prostate cancer. To date, an increasing number of studies have suggested that mushrooms may have beneficial effects on health due their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Mushrooms also reportedly have anti-cancer properties. Preclinical studies indicate that mushrooms have the potential to prevent several kinds of cancers, including prostate cancer. But, to date, only one clinical study (a Phase 1 trial) in humans has been conducted to investigate the effect of mushroom intake on prostate cancer recurrence. Patients who had recurrent prostate cancer were given different doses of white button mushroom powder, and 36% of them experienced a decline in
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