Long-term Hormone Therapy Does More Harm than Good in Prostate Cancer Patients with Low PSA Levels After Surgery, Analysis Shows

Long-term Hormone Therapy Does More Harm than Good in Prostate Cancer Patients with Low PSA Levels After Surgery, Analysis Shows
Men who see their prostate cancer returning after surgery see no benefits from adding long-term hormone therapy to salvage radiation therapy if their PSA levels are low; instead, they might be at higher risk of dying from causes other than cancer, like cardiac or neurological problems, a study has found. The add-on hormone therapy, however, substantially extends the lives of patients whose PSA levels are higher (over 1.5 ng/mL), suggesting that treatment should be tailored based on a man's PSA values at the time of recurrence. The findings were presented recently by Daniel Spratt, MD, professor at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center at the 2019 American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting, held in Chicago, Illinois, Sept. 15-18. The study was titled, “Two Years of Anti-Androgen Treatment Increases Other-CauseMortality in Men Receiving Early Salvage Radiotherapy: ASecondary Analysis of the NRG Oncology/RTOG 9601Randomized Phase III Trial.” "What we showed for the first time is that a patient's PSA level is a predictive biomarker," Spratt, who is the chair of the Genitourinary Clinical Research Program at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center, said in a press release. “... you can use a patient's PSA to better select which men should receive hormone therapy, and to p
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