Stony Brook Team Given $4.2M Grant to Expand Promising Work in Advanced Prostate Cancer

Stony Brook Team Given $4.2M Grant to Expand Promising Work in Advanced Prostate Cancer
Researchers at Stony Brook University have been awarded a five-year, $4.2 million grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to expand work into promising therapeutic agents against metastatic prostate cancer.  The team, led by Iwao Ojima, PhD, director of the Institute of Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery (ICB&DD) at Stony Brook, in collaboration with scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and Artelo Biosciences, is examining a group of proteins called fatty acid-binding proteins (FABs) as targets to treat certain cancers, inflammatory conditions, and pain.  This new funding is based on work originally supported by a seed grant called a "Fusion Award" from the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University. Ojima, along with Martin Kaczocha, PhD, an institute professor, and Cold Spring Harbor professor Lloyd Trotman, PhD, developed FAB5 inhibitors that were significantly toxic to treatment-resistant metastatic prostate cancer cells. FABP5 inhibitors also enhanced the anti-tumor effects of current chemotherapies in animal models. "This grant is a tremendous example of how collaborative research ... have pushed forward a bioscience concept initially supported by seed money from our school to a level where the National Cancer Institute sees its potential as a new and better treatment for metastatic prostate cancer," Kenneth Kaushansky, MD, dean of the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook, said in a press release.  FABP5 is a protein that carries lipid (fat) molecules, whose production is increased in metastatic prostate cancer cells and leads to cell growth, invasion, and tumor formation. The FABP5 inhibitors alone were toxic to prostate cancer cells but showed limited toxicity in noncancerous cells.  When combined
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