Adoptive Cell Therapy Can Slow Prostate Cancer Growth, Study in Mice Reports

Adoptive Cell Therapy Can Slow Prostate Cancer Growth, Study in Mice Reports
Treating prostate cancer animal models with modified immune cells that were isolated from bone marrow led to a significant reduction in tumor growth, a study in mice reports. These findings support a novel strategy called adoptive cell therapy, in which a patient’s immune cells are taken, modified (to remove NF-κB p50, a protein important for immune regulation, in this study's case), and then re-infused to activate the immune system to fight cancer.  The study, “NF-κB p50-deficient immature myeloid cell (p50-IMC) adoptive transfer slows the growth of murine prostate and pancreatic ductal carcinoma,” was published in the Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer. Cancers such as melanoma, colon cancer, fibrosarcoma, and glioblastoma have been shown to grow slower in mice that lack NF-κB p50, compared with normal mice.  Further investigations have suggested that
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