Recommendation Against PSA Routine Screening May Have Contributed to Higher Rates of Advanced PC

Recommendation Against PSA Routine Screening May Have Contributed to Higher Rates of Advanced PC
The U.S. rates of advanced prostate cancer continued to rise in men 50 and older after the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended in 2012 against prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based screening for all men, an American Cancer Society study shows. Notably, the annual increase in men ages 50–74 with the most advanced stage disease after this recommendation (2012–2016) was more than twofold higher than that reported for the previous period (2008–2012). Conversely, there was a drop in the rates of early-stage disease from 2007 to 2016. These data suggest that a reduction in PSA screening after USPSTF’s 2012 recommendation may have prevented earlier cancer detection and contributed to a higher rate of advanced disease. The study, “Prostate Cancer Incidence 5 Years After US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendations Against Screening,” was published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. High levels of PSA, a protein produced by both normal and cancer cells in the prostate, are often an indication of prostate cancer. That's why PSA is  considered a biomarker of the disease. In 2008, the USPSTF issued a recommendation against
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