UK Study to Assess Causes of Greater Prostate Cancer Risk Among Black Men

UK Study to Assess Causes of Greater Prostate Cancer Risk Among Black Men
Enrollment has resumed in a five-year U.K. study investigating genetic factors behind the higher risk of prostate cancer in men of African and Caribbean descent. The study involves researchers at The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, in London, who will run initial biopsy and genetic profiling tests. Black men have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer and are more likely to die from the disease than men of other ethnicities. In the U.K., it is estimated that one in four Black men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime, representing twice the risk for all men. “It is vitally important that we understand what it is that makes prostate cancer more common in men of African and Caribbean descent,” Rosalind Eeles, MD, PhD, the study’s leader and a professor of oncogenetics at the ICR, said in a press release. “We know the secret may lie in changes in the DNA passed on through generations and inherited by the men from their parents. But the only way to understand fully the role played by genetics is to do a study like this one, with enough participants to be able to see the bigger picture,” added Eeles, who is also an honorary consultant clinical oncologist at The Royal Marsden. Matthew Hobbs, PhD, director of research at Prostate Cancer UK, which is also funding the study in partnership with Movember, s
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