U.K. Study to Examine Genetic Screening for Large Prostate Cancer Population

U.K. Study to Examine Genetic Screening for Large Prostate Cancer Population
Genetic screenings of the general population for prostate cancer are feasible, safe, and may be effective at identifying the disease in apparently healthy men who might otherwise remain undiagnosed, according to data from a pilot study in the United Kingdom. Study findings were presented in the oral presentation, “BARCODE 1: A pilot study investigating the use of genetic profiling to identify men in the general population with the highest risk of prostate cancer to invite for targeted screening,” at the 2020 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Virtual Scientific Program. The study, resulting from a collaboration between The Institute of Cancer Research, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, and general practitioners (GPs) across the country, was the first to investigate the feasibility of a genetic screening for prostate cancer in the general U.K. population. During the study, which was funded by the European Research Council, along with Cancer Research UK and the National Institute for Health Research, investigators isolated DNA from saliva samples taken from 307 men, ages 55–69. After isolating DNA from study participants, researchers analyzed it to look for changes in 130 loci that had been associated previously with an increased
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