Prostate Cancer Part of New Non-Invasive Technique Bearing Results For Metastatic Cancer Imaging

Prostate Cancer Part of New Non-Invasive Technique Bearing Results For Metastatic Cancer Imaging
Researchers from Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center, VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine and Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions established a non-invasive method for detecting prostate cancer both localized or spread and metastasized to soft tissues and bone, using preclinical animal models of metastatic prostate cancer. This study is a proof-of-principle of this imaging method that, in the near future, may enable imaging and detection in a non-invasive way and in real-time -- not only for prostate cancer, but for a wide variety of other cancers as well. This study, entitled “AEG-1 promoter-mediated imaging of prostate cancer," was published on the Online First edition of the journal Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, by first author Dr. Akrita Bhatnagar from Dr. Martin G. Pomper's laboratory, in a joint collaboration with Dr. Paul B. Fisher, both co-seniors authors of the study, and colleagues. This pioneer study is a systemically administered, non-invasive, molecular-genetic technique developed in animal models to image bone metastases due to prostate cancer. This novel technique is based on the detection of a gene known as AEG-1, confirmed recently as an oncogene, implicated in cancer development and progression, and expressed in most types of tumors but not normal cells. This method enables the acquisition of bone metastases images in in vivo models, with higher precision than any other imaging technique used in the clinic. "Currently, we do not have a sensitive and specific non-invasive technique to detect bone metastases, so we are very encouraged by the results of this study" said Dr. Fisher, Thelma Newmeyer Corman Endowed Chair in Cancer Research and co-leader of the Cancer
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