Radiation-Hormone Therapy Improves Prostate Cancer Survival

Radiation-Hormone Therapy Improves Prostate Cancer Survival
A new study by a group of researchers at Penn Medicine recently revealed that combining adjunct radiotherapy with hormone therapy results in lower mortality rates among older men diagnosed with locally advanced prostate cancer - a term used to describe prostate cancer that has advanced around the outside of the prostate gland, and may progress to metastasis and death. These observations compared treatment with hormone therapy alone or in combination with radiation therapy, with the results published in this week's issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, funded by the National Cancer Institute, the National Institutes of Health, and the American Cancer Society. The Penn Medicine team, led by Dr. Justin E. Bekelman, an assistant professor of Radiation Oncology, Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine and Abramson Cancer Center, discovered pairing hormone therapy with radiotherapy may effectively reduce cancer-related deaths by almost half among men aged 76 to 86 years old, compared to those on hormone therapy alone. Previous research has revealed as much as 40% of these patients with aggressive prostate cancer receive the latter treatment regimen, showing the big gap in cancer care within baby boomers approaching their 70s. “Failure to use effective treatments for older patients with cancer is a health care quality concern in the United States. Radiation plus hormone therapy is such a treatment for men with aggressive prostate cancers,” said Dr. Bekelman in a news release. “Patients and their physicians should carefully discuss curative treatment options for prostate cancer and reduce the use of hormone therapy alone.” A pair of pivotal clinical studies previously corroborated the highly effective use of hormon
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