Computational Analysis of Prostate Cancer Networks Points Way to Patient-Specific Therapies

Computational Analysis of Prostate Cancer Networks Points Way to Patient-Specific Therapies
Researchers have created a detailed map showing of how genes and proteins interact and cause prostate cancer cells to multiply and escape treatment. They then developed a computational tool to analyze patient-specific information, helping clinicians to choose the most effective treatments for individual prostate cancer patients. The study, by cancer researchers at the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) and colleagues at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), is titled “Phosphoproteome Integration Reveals Patient-Specific Networks in Prostate Cancer” and published in the journal Cell. Working with autopsy tissue samples from metastatic prostate cancer patients, the researchers used a range of specialized techniques to characterize, in detail, individual patient cells. Then, using the computational approach developed, they generated personalized diagrams of signaling pathways corresponding to the cells of each patient. These diagrams may help to identify therapeutic targets for individual patients. Dr. Josh Stuart, a professor of biomolecular engineering at Santa Cruz, director of cancer and stem cell genomics at the UCSC Genomics Institute, and a senior study author, said in a press release: “It's like having a blueprint for each tumor. This is our dream for personalized cancer therapy, so we're not just guessing any more about which drugs will work but can choose drug targets based on what's driving that patient's cancer.” Prostate cancer, like many other types of cancer
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *