Cometriq Attack on Immune Cells May Explain Earlier Failure in Prostate Cancer Trial

Cometriq Attack on Immune Cells May Explain Earlier Failure in Prostate Cancer Trial
A study of Cometriq (cabozantinib) in mice with aggressive prostate cancer may explain why a previous clinical trial of the drug failed to treat human prostate cancer. Researchers demonstrated that Cometriq acts by engaging particular cells of the innate immune system — cells that wiped out aggressive tumors in mice in a matter of days. Since many of the men in the earlier trial had been heavily pretreated with chemotherapy, their immune systems were likely compromised. Even so, the newer findings suggest that Cometriq may indeed help to treat aggressive prostate cancer. The study, “Cabozantinib Eradicates Advanced Murine Prostate Cancer by Activating Anti-Tumor Innate Immunity,” appeared in the journal Cancer Discovery and points to the possibility of using neutrophil cells in cancer immunotherapy. Cometriq blocks a type of enzymes called tyrosine kinases. The enzyme is used by many tumor types, and the medicine is approved for certain types of thyroid or kidney cancer. An earlier Phase 3 clinical trial (NCT01605227), called COMET-1, showed that while the treatment was effective in some men with prostate cancer, others did not respond at all. "Why some of these patients responded and others did not was unclear," Lewis Cantley, PhD, and senior author of the study, said in a press release. Cantley is director of the Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center at New York's 
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