SpaceOAR, Which Wards Off Rectal Radiation Damage, Given to First Canadian Prostate Cancer Patient

SpaceOAR, Which Wards Off Rectal Radiation Damage, Given to First Canadian Prostate Cancer Patient
SpaceOAR hydrogel, which protects organs against damage from radiation therapy, has been administered for the first time to a Canadian prostate cancer patient, according to its maker, Augmenix. Doctors prescribed the treatment at the University Health Network in Toronto's Princess Margaret Cancer Centre. A hydrogel is a liquid that changes to a solid. “Recent clinical data show that SpaceOAR hydrogel helps to significantly reduce the risk of rectal and urinary toxicities and loss of sexual function associated with radiation therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer,” John Pedersen, CEO of Augmenix, said in a press release. “We are pleased that the first patient to be treated with SpaceOAR hydrogel in Canada took place at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, which is globally recognized for innovation and excellence in cancer care.” While many advancements have been made in prostate cancer radiotherapy, the proximity of the prostate and rectum makes it difficult to deliver radiation to the prostate without harming the rectum. That makes the rectum what doctors call an Organ At Risk (OAR) in this case. Doctors insert the hydrogel on the outer wall of the rectum to protect it from radiation. It changes from a liquid to a solid, pushing the prostate and rectum apart. It stays in the body for three months during radiation therapy, and is gradually absorbed and eliminates after that. [caption id="a
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