Advanced Prostate Cancer Patients Do Not Benefit from Reolysin, Taxotere Combo, Trial Shows

Advanced Prostate Cancer Patients Do Not Benefit from Reolysin, Taxotere Combo, Trial Shows
Patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer do not benefit from the addition of Reolysin (pelareorep) to Taxotere (docetaxel), according to recent data from a Phase 2 trial. The trial (NCT01619813) failed to meet its primary endpoint of lack of disease progression at 12 weeks and secondary endpoint of overall survival, with patients receiving the combo treatment showing similar rates as those receiving Taxotere alone. The findings, included in the abstract "A randomized phase II study of pelareorep (REO) plus docetaxel vs. docetaxel alone in patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC): Canadian Cancer Trials Group study IND 209," will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2017 Annual Meeting in June. "In recent years, we and our collaborators have performed numerous phase 1b and phase 2 trials to better understand the anti-tumour mechanisms of Reolysin, to identify the best therapies to pair with Reolysin, and to identify the cancer indications for which Reolysin provides clear benefit," Dr. Matt Coffey, president and CEO of Oncolytics, said in a news release. "While these results themselves indicate that prostate cancer is likely not a viable tumour target, they do not impact our focus on the advancement of Reolysin into a phase 3 registration study in patients with metastatic breast cancer," he added. "We thank the investigators, staff and patients that participated in these trials that delivered very important data to guide the late stage development of Reolysin toward patient populations that can most benefit from its immune-oncology effects." Reolysin, developed by Oncolytics Biotech, is a proprietary formulation of the human reovirus that replicates specifically inside
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