4 Reasons It’s Difficult to Choose Among Treatment Options

4 Reasons It’s Difficult to Choose Among Treatment Options
It took seven emergency room visits, two urgent care visits and two private appointments before doctors understood why I was suffering from bouts of excruciating pain. My chest X-rays, lab tests and an abdominal CT scan all came back normal. Then I had a sonogram. The day after the sonogram, I was immediately referred to

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Rick Redner received his master’s degree in social work from Michigan State University. He has spent many years working as a medical and psychiatric social worker He is the author of the award winning book I Left My Prostate in San Francisco-Where's Yours? His second book Everything You Never Wanted to Know About Erectile Dysfunction and Penile Implants won the Beverly Hills International Book Awards in Men's Health in 2016. Additionally, the book was a winner in the 2017 IAN Book of the Year Awards.

9 comments

  1. Brian says:

    These types of medical decisions happen – when I herniated a disk and it was pressing against a nerve root, I wanted it fixed right now!!
    But, instead of comparing to a gallbladder (or a herniated disk), compare instead to high blood pressure, high cholesterol, etc. Each can be symptom-free, but with blood tests, diagnostic results, prescriptions refilled, treatment decisions are varied and use the patients’ input — there’s no single right answer…..these types of medical decisions and outcomes happen regularly.
    In my case for my early stage prostate cancer, we decided on active surveillance. 5 years and two months later, we’re still convinced it was the right choice.

      • Lawrence Glickman says:

        Finding the right treatment in my opinion should be a case of looking at short and long term results versus side effects. You can find these facts with a little Google work. If you are in early stage (Organ Confined) I would go for a knockout punch but would avoid surgery due too high degrees of side effects. I have noted for myself that the “Cyber Knife” (Robotic Stereostatic Radiation) has the best short and long term results and the fewest side effects. There are many newer treatments but they do not have long enough track records of at least 5-10 years. Beware of Doctors that advise what they are most familiar with.

        • Rick Redner says:

          Peter
          Avoiding surgery may be the right treatment decision for you, but for tens of thousands of men every year surgery is the right choice. I chose surgery. It was the right choice for me. I will not advocate for or against surgery.

      • Brian says:

        My Gleason score in 2012 was 6(3+3); the 2nd opinion confirmed. Same results in 2014 and 2016. Contemplating now if (rather than another biopsy in 2018, which at the very least are uncomfortable and inconvenient) maybe it makes sense to hold off the next biopsy for an additional year and/or have one of those new blood tests done which tests the aggressiveness of cancer. Would prefer staying with active surveillance if the numbers keep pointing in that direction.
        There’s always time to consider alternatives.

        • Lawrence Glickman says:

          Just for the record I have posted my opinion before. “Active Surveillance” is too me a very poor strategy. Ask your Doctor if he can guarantee that during this time period that there will not be metastases to the bones or a vital organ? He will probably quote statistics as his reasoning. Next ask him why is prostate cancer the one form of cancer where early treatment is not recommended? Next ask him, Is it true that a single cell of prostate cancer that escapes the organ can show up later as remote tumors and a slow death sentence? I’m not being dramatic, this is a fact. Statistics are not human beings and using them as means of calming a scared patient out of early treatment is nothing more than playing Russian roulette with the life of that patient. Having helped many of my friends in this area I can only report that one of my friends ignored this advice when he was first diagnosed and waited a year and later had only radical surgery as an option. He survived the surgery and so far so good but he now has potency problems etc which are quite common with this type of treatment. My advice is simple, better safe than sorry later. Get treatment while the opportunity of a cure is at its most available.

  2. Lawrence Glickman says:

    Rick
    After my father died of PC I became a volunteer researcher for the last 15 years and have helped my friends and family with this difficult choice. Your point is well taken. The following book is great and I only wish I had written it. Outside of two new therapies it covers them all by a patient that had medical device experience. Its extremely clear and comprehensive.

    AN ABC OF PROSTATE CANCER TODAY Second Edition My Journey over 4 Continents to Find the Best Cure Alan G. Lawrenson
    Lawrenson, Alan. An ABC of Prostate Cancer Today (Kindle Locations 24-31). Alan G Lawrenson. Kindle Edition.

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