Study Suggests Prostate Cancer Patients Could Produce Antibodies Against Their Own Diseased Cells

Study Suggests Prostate Cancer Patients Could Produce Antibodies Against Their Own Diseased Cells
Researchers at Philadelphia's Wistar Institute have developed a method that delivers synthetic DNA coding for anti-cancer antibodies to cancer patients, allowing for sustained production of these therapeutic antibodies in a patient's bloodstream without multiple injections. The team described using the technology to produce antibodies that bind to PSMA, a prostate cancer protein. This attracted specialized immune cells to the cancer cells, shrinking the tumor and increasing survival. But the method, called DNA-encoded monoclonal antibody (DMAb), has only been tested in mice thus far, and more studies are required to determine its safety and feasibility in cancer patients. The Wistar study, “
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