Find Meaning in Your Cancer-related Suffering

Find Meaning in Your Cancer-related Suffering
My six-year presence on social media provides me with the opportunity to hear from thousands of men and couples coping with prostate cancer. Some of them are doing great, while others had their lives and relationships fall apart. There's not a relationship between prognosis and adjustment outcomes. In other words, some men who are terminal are coping well. They're living their remaining time with meaning and purpose. They're growing closer to their partner. An example is Mark Bradford, who's coping with end-stage prostate cancer. He recently wrote a blog titled, "Last Times." I encourage you to read it. How you cope with the time you have left as a cancer survivor is greatly influenced by your attitude, thoughts, and feelings toward loss and suffering, rather than your prognosis. I believe it's useful for cancer survivors to become familiar with the work of Vicktor Frankl. During World War II, he spent three years in a number of Nazi concentration camps. He faced starvation, unimaginable cruelty, torture, horrendous living conditions, mass executions, and the daily stench of burning flesh. Based on his observations and experiences living in concentration camps, he wrote a book about suffering. The title is "Man's Search For Meaning." I'm going to discuss a few of his quotes related to how to respond to suffering and cancer-related loss. Those who manage to cope well with unwanted change and loss understand this reality: "Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms — to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way." A large number of men get stuck in the belief that erectile dysfunction has taken away their manhood. If that's the meaning attached to losi
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