Cancer Survivorship Gives Grandparenting New Meaning

Cancer Survivorship Gives Grandparenting New Meaning
Living & Loving with Prostate Cancer When I was diagnosed with prostate cancer seven years ago, there were two life events I was certain I wouldn't live long enough to see. The first was walking my daughter down the aisle. The second was living long enough to see one of my children become a parent. In the past seven years, I've been blessed to meet three granddaughters. Perhaps I should feel embarrassed or ashamed to admit that I don't find newborns interesting. They eat, cry, pee, poop, and sleep. As one of my sons observed, "babies don't do anything." I just spent a week in Illinois visiting my newborn granddaughter. As I held her, I was overwhelmed by a rush of thoughts and emotions. It's vastly different holding your child versus holding your grandchild. Time is precious. Grandparents know how quickly each phase ends. It won't be long before they're talking and walking around the house. This means it's important to enjoy each phase, because they end so quickly. I'm more focused as a grandparent. The pressures and cares of the world and career are easily put aside. The outside world ceases to exist in the precious moments of holding your grandchild. As a parent, inconsolable crying was stressful to me in a matter of minutes. As a grandparent, I'm not a fan, but I don't get desperate so quickly. I'm more baby-focused. The panic or need to escape that I felt as a new father isn't there to bother me. I'm not in the least bit worried about spoiling my granddaughter.
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