Higher Doses of Radiation Therapy Don’t Increase Survival in Prostate Cancer Patients, Phase 3 Trial Finds

Higher Doses of Radiation Therapy Don’t Increase Survival in Prostate Cancer Patients, Phase 3 Trial Finds
While higher doses of radiation therapy in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer lower the need for secondary therapies, the approach does not improve overall survival, results from a Phase 3 clinical trial show. The study, “Effect of Standard vs Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Patients With Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer,” was published in JAMA Oncology. Optimizing radiation therapy for treatment of patients with localized prostate cancer can lead to better outcomes, as it has been shown to lower levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) — a marker of prostate cancer growth. However, it is not known whether higher levels of radiation therapy improve overall survival in these patients. Therefore, researchers conducted the NRG Oncology/RTOG 0126 Phase 3 clinical trial (NCT00033631), which included 1,532 patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer at centers across North America. Patients were randomized to one of two radiation therapy regimens: either a higher dose of 79.2 gray — a standard measure of radiation — in 44 visits or the standard dose of 70.2 gray in 39 visits. After a median follow-up of 8.4 years, there were no differences in overall survival between patients in the high dose group and patients in the standard dose group. In fact, the eight-year rates of overall survival were 76% for patients i
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.